Monday, July 11, 2011

Unstructured

I posted the following article on Blogging for a New World Order.
“The war did not end with my election. It entered a new phase.”
President Clinton on the Vietnam War

Sixteen years ago today, President Clinton announced that America would normalize its relations with Vietnam. On the other side of the world, on that same day, Ratko Mladic was walking through the streets of Srebrenica and preparing for what would come next.

For most people, these two events seem unrelated, but they are not.

On November 20, 1969, America agreed to return Okinawa to Japan. On that same day, a group of activists called Indians of All Tribes seized control of Alcatraz and demanded that America return the island to the Native American people.

For most people, these two events seem unrelated, but they are not.

On May 15, 1972, America returned Okinawa to Japan. A couple of days before that and a week or so afterward, the Red Army Faction bombed a pair of U.S. military facilities in Germany.

For most people, these events seem unrelated, but they are not.

On January 1, 1979, America normalized its relations with China. On January 16, the Shah of Iran left his country.

For most people, these two events seem unrelated, but they are not.

On July 16, 1990, Hisahi Owada arrived in China. During that trip, Japan agreed to restart its development assistance program for China. Japan had suspended that program in the wake of the Tiananmen Square protests. On the same day that Owada arrived in China, Saddam Hussein ordered his Republican Guard to move towards Kuwait. A few weeks later, Iraq would invade Kuwait.

For most people, these two events seem unrelated, but they are not.

In the spring of 1994, America was deciding whether or not to extend Most Favored Nation trading status to China. America was also trying to pressure Japan into reducing its trade surplus. On April 6, someone assassinated the President of Rwanda. That assassination ignited the Rwandan Genocide.

For most people, these events seem unrelated, but they are not.

On June 8, 2001, President Bush signed a trade agreement with Vietnam and sent it to Congress for approval. On June 22, Vietnam began its ratification process for the treaty. The previous day, on June 21, the Middle East Broadcasting Corporation interviewed several members of Al Qaeda in Afghanistan. Those terrorists suggested that a major attack might soon occur. After the broadcast, the NSA detected a large increase in the amount of threatening communications. Less than three months later, Al Qaeda would crash four planes into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and a field in Pennsylvania.

For most people, these events seem unrelated, but they are not.

On February 18, 2006, Vietnamese and Japanese officials held a meeting to prepare for the start of formal negotiations for a free trade agreement. On February 20, the Thai Deputy Commerce Minister announced that the free trade agreement between Japan and Thailand would be signed in less than two months. On February 23, Japan and Chile conducted the first round of negotiations for their free trade agreement. The previous day, on February 22, Iraqi insurgent bombed the al-Askari Mosque in Samarra. That bombing ignited a wave of sectarian violence.

For most people, these events seem unrelated, but they are not.

On June 13, 2007, the Japanese House of Councillors ratified the free trade agreements with Chile and Thailand. On that same day, Iraqi insurgents bombed the al-Askari Mosque for the second time.

For most people, these events seem unrelated, but they are not.

“The future would seem less deeply unstructured if we drew conclusions from one simple truth: Those who have the best tools to make history are also those who have the sharpest awareness of its tragic character,” said Therese Delpech, the director for strategic studies at the Atomic Energy Commission of France.

The West has a philosophy called “price tag.” Whenever a nation, usually America, does something favorable for East Asia, Europe does something that America doesn’t like. Europe does this in an attempt to convince America not to do – or not to allow – such a thing to ever happen again. The price that America must pay for these transgressions is sometimes a terrorist attack, or an invasion it must repel, or a genocide it must prevent. The West must stop making these tragedies to advance its interests. It is wrong and it is not even working anymore. History must end.
The day after I posted this, TiVo shares would drop 3 cents to $10.28. Vonage shares would drop 13 cents to $4.61.

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